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© 2020 Organic Redneck

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Organics and Beyond

Organics have been a big part of our value system. We also incorporate biodynamics into our farm as well. We believe that we should be improving the soil, air and water as well providing an equitable, rewarding work place to build a stronger, more secure local economy and healthy population.  

 

Some of the Organic Certification requirements:

  • Maintain accurate records for planting, care, harvest, sales and applications of any substances to soil, plants or water.

  • Requires an annual inspection where your records are reviewed and fields are walked.

  • Prohibits use of any genetically engineered plant or seed material.

  • Organic seed must be used if available.

  • All substances acceptable for organic production must be reviewed by one of several third party labs to ensure their alliance with organic principals.

  •  No raw or uncomposted manures can be used on ground currently producing food or within 90-120 days of harvest.

  • Maintain reciepts of all purchased inputs: seeds, fertilizer, plants. 

  • Make sure equipment or packaging is new or cleaned if it has been used in a conventional system. 

  • These are just a few of the requirements. For more information check our certifier's website:  tilth.org/certification/

History

Oregon's Largest Blueberry Farm in 1952

The farm was originally planted to blueberries in 1952. Many of these same plants are still producing blueberries today. Legend has it that it was the largest blueberry farm in Oregon at that time. Hard to know if it's the truth, but it wouldn't be a suprise. Of course these days there are many other, much larger, blueberry farms. Through the years the farm was known as Branson Blueberries, Henry's and several other names. 

  In 1995 Carol and Douglass, with their children, were looking for some blueberries When they stopped at "Halberts Blueberries," one thing led to another and they ended up buying the whole farm. They thought, "What a solution! Keep the kids busy with farm work and let them graze on blueberries". 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today

Our family has been here for nearly 20 years  and have branched out (no pun intended), to offer much more than just blueberries. The kids mentioned earlier manage the farm and continue to eat lots of blueberries.